Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2006

Highlights at Foothill College

Wednesday, April 12
Asian Pacific Islander Opening Ceremony Celebration
This kick-off event features sensational drumming from the O Nami Taiko of Union City and opening remarks from Foothill College President Bernadine Chuck Fong, Ph.D.
Time: Noon–1 p.m. (College Hour)
Location: Library Quad
Free Admission


Thursday, April 13
4th Annual Origami Workshop
Origami is the art of paper folding. Attend this workshop and learn more about this traditional Japanese craft. Join us to learn a simple, elegant and timeless technique.
Time: Noon–1 p.m.
Location: Room 3523
Free Admission

Monday, April 17
Acupressure for Stress Workshop Featuring Betty Ko
Betty Ko, L.Ac., discusses the ancient healing art of acupressure. She will teach and demonstrate how to you can address stress in your life by acupressure techniques to yourself. Co-sponsored by the Foothill College Health Services Office.
Time: Noon–1:30 p.m.
Location: Room 3523
Free Admission

Tuesday, April 18
The Art of the Hula Featuring Kau’i Isa-Kahaku
An engaging presentation on the art of the hula, including the specific styles, ancient practices, protocols, veiled meaning and how hula has evolved. You will be fascinated by the true essence of hula, and how Hawaiians see it in everyday life. A short DVD will be shown at the beginning of the presentation and one of Kaui's alaka'i (class leader) will demonstrate. Kau’i Isa-Kahuku is the director/kumu hula of halau Na Wai Ola. A hula practitioner for more than 25 years, she has trained with many well-respected kumu hula. She began dancing professionally at age 9, and has performed across the United States and around the globe. Today, her Cupertino-based halau (hula school) enjoys an active student enrollment of more than 250 students.
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Room 1401
Free Admission

Wednesday, April 19
Lecture Series I: San Jose City Councilwoman Madison Nguyen
Madison Nguyen will share her experience as the first Vietnamese American city councilwoman from San Jose’s District Seven. Her impressive resume includes service as the president of the Franklin McKinley School District Governing Board and board of education member, and work assignments as a part-time sociology instructor at De Anza and Evergreen colleges.
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Appreciation Hall (Room 1501)
Free Admission

Wednesday, April 19
2nd Annual Foothill American Idol Contest Finalists & Volunteer Fair
Cheer on your favorite performers at Foothill’s version of the American Idol singing contest. You’ll also learn how you can earn college units for volunteering on and off campus with organizations such as Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month and other groups. Audience members will be awarded gift certificates redeemable at KJ’s Café. Learn how to earn units for volunteering on and off campus with organizations. Co-sponsored by the Volunteer Center and Financial Aid Office.
Time: Noon–12:50 p.m. (College Hour)
Location: Library Quad
Free Admission

Thursday, April 20
Brush Painting Featuring Ami Wada

Japanese brush painting is a creative art form that expresses spiritual depth and beauty by means of Kanji and Kana characters. Artist Ami Wada will demonstrate painting with a brush and ink. Her work is well recognized and intended to capture your imagination. You’ll also have the opportunity to create your own magical paintings.
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Library Quad
Free Admission

Monday, April 24
Japanese Workshop: Language & Tea Ceremony Featuring Ikuko Tomita, Ph.D.

Foothill College Japanese Instructor Ikuko Tomita, Ph.D., will present Survival Japanese Conversation, a Japanese language workshop designed for beginning Japanese students and for people who have no prior experience in speaking Japanese. You’ll learn how to use some basic phrases and vocabulary. The workshop concludes with a formal tea ceremony demonstration. Dr. Tomita will give a brief lecture on the history of the tea ceremony and explain the way of tea. Co-sponsored by the Foothill College Japanese Department and Japanese Cultural Foundation. Seating is first-come, first served, and is limited to 30 students. Free refreshments.
Time: 10–11:50 a.m., Language Workshop; Noon–1 p.m., Tea Ceremony Demonstration & Refreshments
Location: Japanese Cultural Center (Room 6601)
Free Admission

Monday, April 24
Lecture Series II: Rearticulating Slam & Rediscovering Balagtasan—Rhyming Debates & Poetic Jousting

San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales will discuss the significance of spoken word, also known as slam. This oral tradition of literature blends art, tradition, love, hip-hop, emotion, culture and political empowerment. She will also explain the importance of understanding spoken word and its impact on Asian American culture. She will team up with Noel Salunga, a graduate student in ethnic studies whose research focuses on the literary history and significance of performance in Pilipino American literature; Frederick David and Katherine Evasco, students of ethnic studies at San Francisco State University.
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Room 3523
Free Admission

Monday, April 24
Halo Halo Food Workshop
A sweet, creamy and filling dessert, Halo-Halo (from the word halo which means mix) is a favorite Filipino dessert or snack. It’s a mixture of sweet preserved red beans and chick peas, coconut meat (macapuno), jackfruit (langka), pounded dried rice (pinipig), sweet yam (ube), cream flan (leche flan), shreds of sweetened plantain (saba), crushed ice, and milk or coconut milk topped with ice cream. The Foothill Filipino Club will demonstrate how Halo Halo is made, and then make your own.
Time: 12:30–1 p.m.
Location: Room 3523
Free Admission

Tuesday, April 25
The Patriot Act Panel Featuring Peter Irons, Banafsheh Akhlaghi & Sanjeev Bery
A panel of guest speakers will address the Patriot Act and its effect on civil liberties. A professor emeritus of political science at the University of California, San Diego Peter Irons is a successful civil rights attorney, writer and an expert on Supreme Court history and constitutional litigation. His work led to the re-opening of the legality of the Japanese American internment in the U.S. and led to the original convictions of two of the surviving Japanese Americans being vacated in the mid-1980s. The cases became the subject of a 1985 Academy Award-nominated documentary, Unfinished Business. He is the author of numerous books, including Justice at War and Justice Delayed. A practicing civil rights attorney based in San Francisco, Banafsheh Akhlaghi, has become one of the main resources—post September 11, 2001—in California to track Muslim and Arab immigrants detained in California as a result of a special registration program implemented under U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft and the Immigration & Naturalization Service. She has provided pro bono counsel to many Middle Eastern, Muslim and Arab American men caught in these immigration sweeps. Sanjeev Bery is the director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California. He has lectured on the topics of the Security & Freedom Ensured (SAFE) Act, Clear Law Enforcement for Criminal Alien Removal (CLEAR) Act, and Computer-Assisted Passenger Prescreening System (CAPPS II).
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Smithwick Theater (1001)
Free Admission

Wednesday, April 26
Asian Pacific Islander Closing Ceremony Celebration & Club Day
This exciting celebration features Club Day where you can visit recruiting tables, meet club leaders and members, and learn how to join or start a campus club. With a performance by the Foothill American Idol contest winner, raffle baskets, scholarship announcements, and closing remarks by Foothill College Adaptive Learning & Disabled Services Division Dean Gertrude Gregorio. Co-sponsored by the Organizations Board of Directors (OBD).
Time: Noon–1 p.m. (College Hour)
Location: Library Quad
Free Admission

Thursday, April 27
Lecture Series III: Stand Up for Justice, A Film Presentation Featuring John Esaki, Writer/ Director & Amy Kato, Producer
This 30-minute drama tells the true story of Ralph Lazo, a 16-year-old Mexican-Irish American high school student who voluntarily joined his Japanese American friends at the Manzanar internment camp during World War II. Stand Up For Justice explores the enduring values of friendship and loyalty between teen-agers of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds and reveals how one person’s actions earn the undying gratitude of a community. Directed by John Esaki and produced by Amy Kato, this film is a production of Visual Communications and Nikkei for Civil Rights & Redress. Esaki is now director of the Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center of the Japanese American National Museum. Kato has been a staff member at Visual Communications since 1981, and is currently the director of Operations. Co-sponsored by Organizacion Latino Americana (OLA).
Time: 10–11:50 a.m.
Location: Appreciation Hall (1501)
Free admission




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